Evaluation of three interventions to promote workplace health and safety: Evidence for the utility of implementation intentions

This article evaluates a motivational intervention based on the theory of planned behavior, a volitional intervention based on implementation intentions, and a combined motivational plus volitional intervention in promoting attendance at workplace health and safety training courses in the UK. Intervention manipulations were embedded in postal questionnaires completed by participants (N=271). Subsequent attendance over a 3-month period was determined from course records. Findings showed that the volitional and combined interventions doubled the rate of attendance compared to the motivational and control conditions (rates were 39%, 32%, 12%, and 16%, respectively). The effects of the volitional intervention were independent of the effects of previous attendance, demographic variables, employment characteristics, and variables from the theory of planned behavior.